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Monthly Archives: February 2010

Protect your Handbag

  • February 22, 2010
  • 3 comments
  • The Chelsea Clip

    The Chelsea Clip was invented in 1991 since then it has been providing a preventative solution to the problem of thefts of handbags and personal luggage. It has been specifically designed to secure personal belongings within public places and you may have seen them in bars, pubs, cafes and restaurants as well as anywhere that personal property may be vulnerable to theft –

    The Chelsea Clip is a specially designed, injection moulded Nylon hook from which a bag, or other small item of personal luggage, can be suspended by its own strap. The item is easily placed onto the Chelsea Clip but two hands are required for its removal, making ‘handbag snatching’ virtually impossible.

    Also described as the bar clip, metclip, bar hook and purse clip, it is highly recommended by UK. Crime Prevention Officers

    http://www.selectadna.co.uk/chelsea-clips.html?gclid=CNrEy92chqACFQGZ2AodVVSDlg

    The Handbag Hook

    Unfortunately not all public places have Chelsea Clips so the answer is to take your own device! There are personal hooks which can be carried in your handbag, and used on most flat surfaces, your bag slips on via its strap but as it is not permanent and it doesn’t require two hands for removal it won’t be as secure as the Chelsea Clip, but it will keep your bag off the floor, clean and close. There are many varieties of handbag hook and they make great gifts as they are neat and compact and can be even be personalised.

    The handbag Hook is also described as the Handbag Butler…..

    So whenever you are out and about, you will always be able to sit down and hang your handbag beside you and be practical and look stylish at the same time……

    read more
    by Ron

Boss Fined for Supplying Unlicensed Guards

  • 3 comments
  • A security boss has been ordered to pay £1,000 after pleading guilty to supplying unlicensed security guards.

    William Boyd, 56, of Port Glasgow, Renfrewshire, was director of Greenock-based MHM (Scotland) that deployed security staff to various construction sites in the area.

    At Greenock Sheriff Court on1st February 2010, Boyd pleaded guilty to supplying unlicensed security guards to sites and was ordered to pay £1,000.

    By law, contracted security guards must hold and display a valid SIA licence. Those who manage, supervise and/or employ individuals who engage in licensable activity must also hold at least a non-front line licence.

    Sharon Roberts, an SIA Head of Investigation, said “I am pleased with this result. It sends out a strong message to those supplying security staff that flouting the law will not be tolerated. I would urge all directors and managers of security companies to ensure they comply with the legislation.”

    Under the Private Security Industry Act 2001 the maximum penalties are:

    For working in a licensable role without an SIA licence:

    Upon summary conviction at a Magistrate’s Court, Sheriff Court or District Court, a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000;

    and for supplying unlicenced staff:

    Upon summary conviction at a Magistrates’ Court, Sheriff Court or District Court, a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000.

    Upon conviction on indictment at Crown Court, High Court of Justiciary or Sheriff and jury trial, an unlimited fine and/or up to five years imprisonment.

    The Security Industry Authority regulates the private security industry in the United Kingdom under the Private Security Industry Act 2001, reporting to the Home Secretary. Its main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme approving private security suppliers.

    http://www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk/Pages/about-news.aspx?newsID=212

    read more
    by Ron

Security Boss Fined for Supplying Unlicensed Security Guards

  • 3 comments
  • A security boss has been ordered to pay £1,000 after pleading guilty to supplying unlicensed security guards.

    William Boyd, 56, of Port Glasgow, Renfrewshire, was director of Greenock-based MHM (Scotland) that deployed security staff to various construction sites in the area.

    At Greenock Sheriff Court on1st February 2010, Boyd pleaded guilty to supplying unlicensed security guards to sites and was ordered to pay £1,000.

    By law, contracted security guards must hold and display a valid SIA licence. Those who manage, supervise and/or employ individuals who engage in licensable activity must also hold at least a non-front line licence.

    Sharon Roberts, an SIA Head of Investigation, said “I am pleased with this result. It sends out a strong message to those supplying security staff that flouting the law will not be tolerated. I would urge all directors and managers of security companies to ensure they comply with the legislation.”

    Under the Private Security Industry Act 2001 the maximum penalties are:

    For working in a licensable role without an SIA licence:

    Upon summary conviction at a Magistrate’s Court, Sheriff Court or District Court, a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000;

    and for supplying unlicenced staff:

    Upon summary conviction at a Magistrates’ Court, Sheriff Court or District Court, a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000.

    Upon conviction on indictment at Crown Court, High Court of Justiciary or Sheriff and jury trial, an unlimited fine and/or up to five years imprisonment.

    The Security Industry Authority regulates the private security industry in the United Kingdom under the Private Security Industry Act 2001, reporting to the Home Secretary. Its main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme approving private security suppliers.

    http://www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk/Pages/about-news.aspx?newsID=212

    read more
    by Ron