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Security Boss Fined for Supplying Unlicensed Security Guards

  • 3:53 pm
  • 0. comments
  • A security boss has been ordered to pay £1,000 after pleading guilty to supplying unlicensed security guards.

    William Boyd, 56, of Port Glasgow, Renfrewshire, was director of Greenock-based MHM (Scotland) that deployed security staff to various construction sites in the area.

    At Greenock Sheriff Court on1st February 2010, Boyd pleaded guilty to supplying unlicensed security guards to sites and was ordered to pay £1,000.

    By law, contracted security guards must hold and display a valid SIA licence. Those who manage, supervise and/or employ individuals who engage in licensable activity must also hold at least a non-front line licence.

    Sharon Roberts, an SIA Head of Investigation, said “I am pleased with this result. It sends out a strong message to those supplying security staff that flouting the law will not be tolerated. I would urge all directors and managers of security companies to ensure they comply with the legislation.”

    Under the Private Security Industry Act 2001 the maximum penalties are:

    For working in a licensable role without an SIA licence:

    Upon summary conviction at a Magistrate’s Court, Sheriff Court or District Court, a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000;

    and for supplying unlicenced staff:

    Upon summary conviction at a Magistrates’ Court, Sheriff Court or District Court, a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000.

    Upon conviction on indictment at Crown Court, High Court of Justiciary or Sheriff and jury trial, an unlimited fine and/or up to five years imprisonment.

    The Security Industry Authority regulates the private security industry in the United Kingdom under the Private Security Industry Act 2001, reporting to the Home Secretary. Its main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme approving private security suppliers.

    http://www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk/Pages/about-news.aspx?newsID=212

    read more
    by Ron

Boss Fined for Supplying Unlicensed Guards

  • 3:53 pm
  • 0. comments
  • A security boss has been ordered to pay £1,000 after pleading guilty to supplying unlicensed security guards.

    William Boyd, 56, of Port Glasgow, Renfrewshire, was director of Greenock-based MHM (Scotland) that deployed security staff to various construction sites in the area.

    At Greenock Sheriff Court on1st February 2010, Boyd pleaded guilty to supplying unlicensed security guards to sites and was ordered to pay £1,000.

    By law, contracted security guards must hold and display a valid SIA licence. Those who manage, supervise and/or employ individuals who engage in licensable activity must also hold at least a non-front line licence.

    Sharon Roberts, an SIA Head of Investigation, said “I am pleased with this result. It sends out a strong message to those supplying security staff that flouting the law will not be tolerated. I would urge all directors and managers of security companies to ensure they comply with the legislation.”

    Under the Private Security Industry Act 2001 the maximum penalties are:

    For working in a licensable role without an SIA licence:

    Upon summary conviction at a Magistrate’s Court, Sheriff Court or District Court, a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000;

    and for supplying unlicenced staff:

    Upon summary conviction at a Magistrates’ Court, Sheriff Court or District Court, a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000.

    Upon conviction on indictment at Crown Court, High Court of Justiciary or Sheriff and jury trial, an unlimited fine and/or up to five years imprisonment.

    The Security Industry Authority regulates the private security industry in the United Kingdom under the Private Security Industry Act 2001, reporting to the Home Secretary. Its main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme approving private security suppliers.

    http://www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk/Pages/about-news.aspx?newsID=212

    read more
    by Ron